HOW MUCH DO I KNOW ABOUT to encode the Batak script in the BMP of the UCS.

Doc Type: Working Group Document

Title:

Proposal for encoding the Batak script in the UCS
Source:
Michael Everson
Status:
Individual Contribution
Action:
For consideration by JTC1/SC2/WG2 and UTC
Replaces: UTR#3, N3293R
Date:
2008-01-25
This is a preliminary proposal to encode the Batak script in the BMP of the UCS. Please note that in this
document, the traditional dotted circle used to identify combining characters has been replaced by a
dotted oval. This has been done in order to make clear the relative positions of the diacritical marks. It is
intended that in the printed charts of ISO/IEC 10646 and the Unicode Standard these dotted ovals be
retained.
1. Introduction. The Batak script is used on the island of Sumatra to write the five Batak dialects Karo,
Mandailing, Pakpak, Simalungun, and Toba. The script is called surat na sampulu sia ‘the nineteen
letters’, or si-sia-sia. Batak is read from left to right. (Descriptions of Batak writing, like those of Tagalog
and Buhid, which talk about writing vertically bottom-to-top along the length of a piece of bamboo, are
based on an observation of practical writing behaviour. Anyone engraving Latin script with the point of a
knife on bamboo in the same way would do likewise.) The Batak script is taught in schools more for
cultural purposes than as a practical writing system for Batak, which, when written, uses Latin ortho graphy
(though the overwhelming majority of writing by Bataks is in Indonesian, as elsewhere in Indonesia).
Batak script does enjoy public display for instance in the signage of shops and governmental institutions.
2. Structure. The Batak script is of the Brahmic type. It has a vowel killer which is called pangolat in
Mandailing, Pakpak, and Toba (where it has the shape

@≤

); the Karo call the killer pĕnĕngĕn, and the
Simalungen call it panongonan (it has the shape

@≥

for those groups). Consonant conjuncts are not
formed. (It is worth noting that this simplification, found also in other insular Southeast Asian scripts
outside of Java and Bali, is a sensible and appropriate response to the CV(C) structure of the languages in
the region, and is by no means a “corruption” of the original Brahmic prototype.) Batak has three
independent vowels (

A

,

I

,

U

) and makes use of a number of vowel signs and two consonant signs.
3. Dependent vowel signs. The dependent vowels are as follows (shown with

í

RA

and

ì

SIMALUNGUN
RA

and with

ô

SIMALUNGUN SA

for

HABORITAN ABOVE

):

íß

=

í

ra +

í®

rĕ =

í

ra +

-ĕ (Pakpak)

í©

re
=

í

ra +

-e

í™

ri
=

í

ra +

@™

-i

ìr

=

ì

ra +

@

-i (Simalungun)

ír

=

í

ra +

@

-o

í≠

ro =

í

ra +

@≠

-o (Karo)

íÆ

ru
=

í

ra +

-u

ôØ

su =

ô

sa +

-u (Simalungun)
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í∞

rang =

í

ra +

@∞

-ng

í±

rah
=

í

ra +

-h

í≤

r
=

í

ra +

@≤

killer

ì≥

r =

ì

ra +

@≥

(Simalungun)
It should be noted that some of the vowel signs are limited to use by certain groups. Only the Karo and
Pakpak have the sound ĕ, and use

KEBERETEN

for it, though the Pakpak sometimes use

KETOLONGEN

instead. Karo writers use either the

KETOLONGEN

or the

@≠

HATULUNGAN

for o;

HATULUNGAN

is used by the Simulungun for ou. Karo writers always use

@

SIALA ULU

for u (though the
other groups use it for o); Karo writers may use either

@™

ULUA

or

@

HALUAN

for i. (There is no
universally-applied naming convention for these characters; for instance

TALINGA

is talinga in
Mandailing, hatadingan in Toba, hatalingan in Simalungun, kĕtadingin in Pakpak, and kĕtelengĕn in
Karo. The names here were chosen for uniqueness.)
4. Rendering. The vowel signs

@™

ULUA

i,

@

HALUAN

i,

@

SIALA ULU

o, the consonant sign

@

HAJORINGAN

h, and the two killers

@≤

PANGOLAT

and

@≥

PANONGONAN

are spacing marks. The vowel
signs

TALINGA

e and

@∞

AMISARA

ng are non-spacing marks, the former drawn to the left side of the
character and the latter to the right side. (When the two occur together on a consonant, there are two
marks above:

í©∞

reng;

í

RA

+

TALINGA

+

@∞

AMISARA

.) The vowel sign

BORUTA

u is placed
under a consonant and somewhat to the right; it can ligate with its base consonant.

¿

u
=

Ä

a
+

-u

¡

u
=

Å

S a +

-u

¬

hu
=

Ç

ha
+

-u

hu
=

É

S ha +

-u

ƒ

hu
=

Ñ

M ha +

-u

bu
=

Ö

ba
+

-u

ΔÆ

bu* =

Ü

K ba +

-u

«

pu
=

á

pa
+

-u

»

pu
=

à

S pa +

-u

nu
=

â

na
+

-u nu
=

ä

M na +

-u

À

wu =

ã

wa
+

-u

Ã

wu =

å

S wa +

-u

Õ

wu =

ç

P wa +

-u

Œ

gu
=

é

ga
+

-u

œ

gu
=

è

S ga +

-u

ju
=

ê

ja
+

-u

du
=

ë

da
+

-u

ru
=

í

ra
+

-u

ru
=

ì

S ra +

-u

mu =

î

ma
+

-u

mu =

ï

S ma +

-u

÷

tu
=

ñ

S ta +

-u

tu
=

ó

N ta +

-u

ÿ

su
=

ò

sa
+

-u

Ÿ

su
=

ô

S sa +

-u

(Mandailing)

su
=

ö

M sa +

-u

ôØ

su
=

ô

S sa +

-u

(Simalungun)

yu
=

õ

ya
+

-u

yu
=

ú

S ya +

-u

ngu =

ù

nga +

-u

fi

lu
=

û

la
+

-u

fl

lu
=

ü

S la +

-u

nyu =

nya +

-u

·Æ

cu* =

·

ca
+

-u

‚Æ

ndu* =

¢

nda +

-u

„Æ

mbu*=

mba +

-u
Note that the forms given with asterisks above do not occur since the letters are only used in Karo, which
writes

Üb

,

°c

,

¢n

, and

£m

. Note too that while Mandailing may use

Ÿ

for su, in
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Simalungun the

u vowel is not used with this letter. Instead the diacritic

HABORITAN FOR
SIMALUNGUN SA

is used—only with this letter:

ôØ

.
The non-spacing consonant modifier

TOMPI

is used to change the value of

Ç

,

É

, or

Ñ

(all ha) to ka
as

Ƕ

,

ɶ

,

Ѷ

in Mandailing, and to change

ò

,

ô

, or

ö

(all sa) to ca as

ò¶

,

ô¶

,

ö¶

in Mandailing.
The consonant signs

@∞

AMISARA

ng and

HAJORINGAN

h are usually rendered above the vowels

KEBERETEN

ĕ,

@™

ULUA

i,

@

HALUAN

i, and

@

SIALA ULA

o: as in

á™∞

ping,

á¨∞

pong,

áß±

pĕh,

à´±

pih.
The main peculiarity of Batak rendering has to do with the way vowel glyphs are re-ordered when the
killer (

PANGOLAT

or

PANONGONAN

) is used to close the syllable by killing the inherent vowel. This re-
ordering is entirely regular and there are no exceptions to it.

ñá≤

tap =

ñ

ta
+

á

pa
+

@≤

PANGOLAT

ñáß≤

tĕp =

ñ

ta +

+

á

pa
+

@≤

PANGOLAT

ñá©≤

tep =

ñ

ta +

-e
+

á

pa
+

@≤

PANGOLAT

ñá™≤

tip =

ñ

ta +

@™

-i
+

á

pa
+

@≤

PANGOLAT

ñá¨≤

top =

ñ

ta +

@

-o +

á

pa
+

@≤

PANGOLAT

ñ«≤

tup =

ñ

ta +

-u +

á

pa
+

@≤

PANGOLAT

So although the backing store for tip is

TA

+

I

+

PA

+

PANGOLAT

, the display is not *

ñ™á≤

(which cannot
occur) but rather

ñá™≤

. One way a font might implement this would be with a set of triplets, Vowel +
Consonant + Killer = glyph-CVK. In the event that a visual order were entered in the text stream, an
error state could be indicated with the retention of the dotted circle, thus:

ñá™≤

tip =

ñ

ta +

@™

-i
+

á

pa
+

@≤

PANGOLAT

(correct)

ñá™@≤

tapiK=

ñ

ta +

á

pa
+

@™

-i +

@≤

PANGOLAT

(incorrect)
Another way of putting this is to say that the

PANGOLAT

cannot follow a

VOWEL SIGN

, but only a

LETTER

.
5. Unification. Karo, Mandailing, Pakpak, Simalungun, and Toba each uses the script in a different way.
While language groups share most of their letters in common, sometimes a letter with a value in one
language has a different value in another. The letter

, for instance is nya in Simalunge, Toba, and
Mandailing, but ca in Karo; compare Latin c, which may be [k] or [s] or [ts] or [dʒ] depending on
language. This proposal encodes the superset of forms, regardless of pronunciation.
6. Punctuation. Punctuation is not normally used, all letters simply running together, but a number of

BINDU

characters do exist and are occasionally used to disambiguate similar words or phrases. The

ø

BINDU PANGOLAT

is trailing punctuation, following a word, surrounding the previous character somewhat.
The bindu apparently appears in several forms. The major mark used to begin texts is called the

BINDU GODANG

‘large bindu’. In letters written on bamboo, the

ª

BINDU
PINARJOLMA

‘human-being-shaped bindu’ and is used instead of the

BINDU GODANG

. There are many glyph
variants of the bindu pinarjolma; when it is more snake-like than anthropomorphic, it is sometimes called
bindu pinarulok ‘snake-shaped bindu’. The actual length of the glyph for these marks is up to the font
designer. It will readily be seen that the variation in the shapes of Batak punctuation is very free.
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The minor mark used to begin paragraphs and stanzas is called the

º

BINDU NA METEK

‘small bindu’. It
may have a number of variants such as

Ω

BINDU PINARBORAS

‘rice-shaped bindu’, again used to separate
sections of text. These marks can be written as large signs that physically separate sections of text, for
instance by means of a long trailing line leading from them. A sign called

æ

BINDU JUDUL

‘title bindu’ is
also sometimes used to separate a title from the main text which normally begins on the same line.
7. Collating order. Alphabetical order differs somewhat amongst the different languages. All sorting
elements are treated with primary weight.
[To be supplied. Ordering may have to be syllabic, given the unusual way final consonants are handled.
Should a unified and language-specific orderings be given? Ken’s view on primary-weight sorting would
be useful. Like Old Turkic?]
7.1. Mandailing. The Mandailing alphabetical order differs somewhat from Toba, and North Mandailing
again differs slightly from South Mandailing. Some of the letter shapes are likewise slightly different;
these are ha and sa. The rendering forms for the consonant vowel-sign combinations pa+u, sa+u, and
la+u may differ from the forms used for Toba Batak. Mandailing uses two other letters for ka and ca
sounds. These two letters are produced by putting a mark called tompi onto the normal letters for ha and
sa. It is not known whether the tompi is otherwise productive. [To be revised or deleted.]
7.2. Pakpak. Pakpak alphabetical order also differs from Toba and Mandailing. Pakpak does not include
the letter nya. The forms for ta and wa differ significantly from those used for Toba. The vowel sign
listed in the chart as u is pronounced more like a closed e and written after the associated consonant
rather than under (or attached to) the consonant. The sign sikordjan, which is pronounced as a soft h
following the associated vowel, is placed over the consonant. When final ng is used in Pakpak, it goes
over the previous consonant rather than over the vowel sign. In Toba, it may optionally go over the vowel
if the vowel is not a non-spacing mark. [To be revised or deleted.]
8. Character names. The character names used follow Kozok 1999. Language identifiers are used to
distinguish the characters in UCS terms; usually the language identifier chosen was

SIMALUNGUN

because Simalungun is the most common variant. It should be noted, however, that the use of the
modifier does not imply that a character is only used in Simalungun Batak; the designation is arbitrary.
9. Linebreaking. Opportunities for line-break occur after any full orthographic syllable, defined as
C(V(Cp|F)) where a consonant C may be followed by a vowel V which may be followed either by a
killed consonant Cp or a final -ng or –h F. Batak punctuation marks can be expected to have behaviour
similar to that of Devanagari

DANDA

.
10. Unicode Character Properties.

1BC0;BATAK LETTER A;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BC1;BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN A;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BC2;BATAK LETTER HA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BC3;BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN HA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BC4;BATAK LETTER MANDAILING HA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BC5;BATAK LETTER BA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BC6;BATAK LETTER KARO BA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BC7;BATAK LETTER PA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BC8;BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN PA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BC9;BATAK LETTER NA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BCA;BATAK LETTER MANDAILING NA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BCB;BATAK LETTER WA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BCC;BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN WA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BCD;BATAK LETTER PAKPAK WA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BCE;BATAK LETTER GA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BCF;BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN GA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BD0;BATAK LETTER JA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BD1;BATAK LETTER DA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BD2;BATAK LETTER RA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;

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1BD3;BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN RA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BD4;BATAK LETTER MA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BD5;BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN MA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BD6;BATAK LETTER SOUTHERN TA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BD7;BATAK LETTER NORTHERN TA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BD8;BATAK LETTER SA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BD9;BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN SA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BDA;BATAK LETTER MANDAILING SA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BDB;BATAK LETTER YA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BDC;BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN YA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BDD;BATAK LETTER NGA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BDE;BATAK LETTER LA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BDF;BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN LA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BE0;BATAK LETTER NYA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BE1;BATAK LETTER CA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BE2;BATAK LETTER NDA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BE3;BATAK LETTER MBA;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BE4;BATAK LETTER I;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BE5;BATAK LETTER U;Lo;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BE6;BATAK SIGN TOMPI;Mn;228;NSM;;;;;N;;;;;
1BE7;BATAK VOWEL SIGN KEBERETEN;Mc;226;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BE8;BATAK VOWEL SIGN KETOLONGEN;Mn;232;NSM;;;;;N;;;;;
1BE9;BATAK VOWEL SIGN TALINGA;Mn;228;NSM;;;;;N;;;;;
1BEA;BATAK VOWEL SIGN ULUA;Mc;226;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BEB;BATAK VOWEL SIGN HALUAN;Mc;226;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BEC;BATAK VOWEL SIGN SIALA ULU;Mc;226;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BED;BATAK VOWEL SIGN HATULUNGAN;Mn;232;NSM;;;;;N;;;;;
1BEE;BATAK VOWEL SIGN BORUTA;Mn;232;NSM;;;;;N;;;;;
1BEF;BATAK VOWEL SIGN HABORITAN FOR SIMALUNGUN SA;Mn;230;NSM;;;;;N;;;;;
1BF0;BATAK CONSONANT SIGN AMISARA;Mn;232;NSM;;;;;N;;;;;
1BF1;BATAK CONSONANT SIGN HAJORINGAN;Mn;232;NSM;;;;;N;;;;;
1BF2;BATAK PANGOLAT;Mn;9;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BF3;BATAK PANONGONAN;Mn;9;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BFA;BATAK SYMBOL BINDU GODANG;Po;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BFB;BATAK SYMBOL BINDU PINARJOLMA;Po;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BFC;BATAK SYMBOL BINDU NA METEK;Po;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BFD;BATAK SYMBOL BINDU PINARBORAS;Po;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BFE;BATAK SYMBOL BINDU JUDUL;Po;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;
1BFF;BATAK SYMBOL BINDU PANGOLAT;Po;0;L;;;;;N;;;;;

11. Bibliography.
Daniels, Peter T., and William Bright, eds. 1996. The world’s writing systems. New York; Oxford: Oxford
University Press. ISBN 0-19-507993-0
Kozok, Uli. 1999. Warisan leluhur: sastra lama dan aksara Batak. Jakarta: École française d’Extrême-
Orient. ISBN 979-9023-33-5
Kozok, Uli. 2004. Reference list to the Batak-Dutch Dictionary by H. N. Van der Tuuk = Daftar rujukan
untuk Kamus Batak-Belanda oleh H. N. Van der Tuuk. Jakarta: Wedatama Widya Sastra. ISBN
979-3258-37-3
Meerwaldt, J. H. 1904. Handleiding tot de beoefening der bataksche taal. Leiden: E. J. Brill.
Unicode Consortium. 1992. Unicode Technical Report #3: exploratory proposals.
van der Tuuk, H. N. A Grammar of Toba Batak.
12. Acknowledgements. This project was made possible in part by a grant from the U.S. National
Endowment for the Humanities, which funded the Script Encoding Initiative in respect of the Batak
encoding.
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Proposal for encoding the Batak script in the UCS
Michael Everson

Row 1B: BATAK DRAFT
6

1BC
1BD
1BE

Ä ê †
°
¢
£
§
@™
@
@
@≠

1BF

@∞
@
±
@≤
@≥
¥
μ
π

ª

º
Ω
æ
ø
Å ë
Ç í
É ì
Ñ î
Ö ï
Ü ñ
á ó
à ò
â ô
ä ö
ã õ
å ú
ç ù
é û
è ü

0
1
2
3
4
5
6
7
8
9
A
B
C
D
E
F

hex

C0
C1
C2
C3
C4
C5
C6
C7
C8
C9
CA
CB
CC
CD
CE
CF
D0
D1
D2
D3
D4
D5
D6
D7
D8
D9
DA
DB
DC
DD
DE
DF
E0
E1
E2
E3
E4
E5
E6
E7
E8
E9
EA
EB
EC
ED
EE
EF
F0
F1
F2
F3
F4
F5
F6
F7
F8
F9
FA
FB
FC
FD
FE
FF

Name

BATAK LETTER A
BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN A
BATAK LETTER HA
BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN HA
BATAK LETTER MANDAILING HA
BATAK LETTER BA
BATAK LETTER KARO BA
BATAK LETTER PA
BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN PA
BATAK LETTER NA
BATAK LETTER MANDAILING NA
BATAK LETTER WA
BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN WA
BATAK LETTER PAKPAK WA
BATAK LETTER GA
BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN GA
BATAK LETTER JA
BATAK LETTER DA
BATAK LETTER RA
BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN RA
BATAK LETTER MA
BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN MA
BATAK LETTER SOUTHERN TA
BATAK LETTER NORTHERN TA
BATAK LETTER SA
BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN SA
BATAK LETTER MANDAILING SA
BATAK LETTER YA
BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN YA
BATAK LETTER NGA
BATAK LETTER LA
BATAK LETTER SIMALUNGUN LA
BATAK LETTER NYA
BATAK LETTER CA
BATAK LETTER NDA
BATAK LETTER MBA
BATAK LETTER I
BATAK LETTER U
BATAK SIGN TOMPI
BATAK VOWEL SIGN KEBERETEN
BATAK VOWEL SIGN KETOLONGEN
BATAK VOWEL SIGN TALINGA
BATAK VOWEL SIGN ULUA
BATAK VOWEL SIGN HALUAN
BATAK VOWEL SIGN SIALA ULU
BATAK VOWEL SIGN HATULUNGAN
BATAK VOWEL SIGN BORUTA
BATAK VOWEL SIGN HABORITAN FOR SIMALUNGUN SA
BATAK CONSONANT SIGN AMISARA
BATAK CONSONANT SIGN HAJORINGAN
BATAK PANGOLAT
BATAK PANONGONAN
(This position shall not be used)
(This position shall not be used)
(This position shall not be used)
(This position shall not be used)
(This position shall not be used)
(This position shall not be used)
BATAK SYMBOL BINDU GODANG
BATAK SYMBOL BINDU PINARJOLMA
BATAK SYMBOL BINDU NA METEK
BATAK SYMBOL BINDU PINARBORAS
BATAK SYMBOL BINDU JUDUL
BATAK SYMBOL BINDU PANGOLAT


Page 7

Figures.
Figure 1. Description in Dutch of the Batak script.
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Figure 2. Sample of Batak text on a sign for a hospital in Sumatra.
Figure 3. Photograph of a person writing of Batak text.
The hand position shows right-to-left directionality.
Figure 4. Sample of Batak text showing one example of

BINDU NA METEK

and two examples of

BINDU
PINARBORAS

, one of which has a trailing line following from it. This kind of formatting would be
achieved by a higher-level protocol in an encoded text.
8


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Figure 5. Sample of Batak text awr by van der Tuuk, showing

BINDU PINARBORAS

and

BINDU PANGOLAT

.
Figure 6. Sample of Batak text showing three examples of

BINDU NA METEK

.
Figure 7. Sample of Batak text showing

BINDU GODANG

in the first line.
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Figure 8. Sample of Toba Batak text set by van der Tuuk,
showing

BINDU GODANG

,

BINDU JUDUL

, and

BINDU PANGOLAT

.
10


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Figure 9. Sample of Mandailing Batak text
showing

BINDU GODANG

,

BINDU JUDUL

, and

BINDU PANGOLAT

.
Figure 10. Sample of Batak text showing

BINDU PINARJOLMA

set as a kind of drop-cap with text nestled within it.
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Figure 11. Sample of Batak text showing

BINDU GODANG

above and

BINDU NA METEK

in the centre.
Figure 12. Sample of Batak text showing two examples of

BINDU PINARBORAS

, one with a trailing line.
12


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Figure 13. Sample of Batak text showing a number of examples of

BINDU PINARJOLMA

.
13


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A. Administrative

1. Title
Proposal for encoding the Batak script in the BMP of the UCS
2. Requester’s name
Michael Everson
3. Requester type (Member body/Liaison/Individual contribution)
Individual contribution.
4. Submission date
2008-01-25
5. Requester’s reference (if applicable)
6. Choose one of the following:
6a. This is a complete proposal
No.
6b. More information will be provided later
Yes.

B. Technical – General

1. Choose one of the following:
1a. This proposal is for a new script (set of characters)
Yes.
1b. Proposed name of script
Batak.
1c. The proposal is for addition of character(s) to an existing block
No.
1d. Name of the existing block
2. Number of characters in proposal
58.
3. Proposed category (A-Contemporary; B.1-Specialized (small collection); B.2-Specialized (large collection); C-Major extinct; D-Attested
extinct; E-Minor extinct; F-Archaic Hieroglyphic or Ideographic; G-Obscure or questionable usage symbols)
Category A.
4a. Is a repertoire including character names provided?
Yes.
4b. If YES, are the names in accordance with the “character naming guidelines” in Annex L of P&P document?
Yes.
4c. Are the character shapes attached in a legible form suitable for review?
Yes.
5a. Who will provide the appropriate computerized font (ordered preference: True Type, or PostScript format) for publishing the standard?
Michael Everson.
5b. If available now, identify source(s) for the font (include address, e-mail, ftp-site, etc.) and indicate the tools used:
Michael Everson, Fontographer.
6a. Are references (to other character sets, dictionaries, descriptive texts etc.) provided?
Yes.
6b. Are published examples of use (such as samples from newspapers, magazines, or other sources) of proposed characters attached?
Yes.
7. Does the proposal address other aspects of character data processing (if applicable) such as input, presentation, sorting, searching,
indexing, transliteration etc. (if yes please enclose information)?
Yes.
8. Submitters are invited to provide any additional information about Properties of the proposed Character(s) or Script that will assist in
correct understanding of and correct linguistic processing of the proposed character(s) or script. Examples of such properties are: Casing
information, Numeric information, Currency information, Display behaviour information such as line breaks, widths etc., Combining
behaviour, Spacing behaviour, Directional behaviour, Default Collation behaviour, relevance in Mark Up contexts, Compatibility
equivalence and other Unicode normalization related information. See the Unicode standard at http://www.unicode.org for such information
on other scripts. Also see Unicode Character Database http://www.unicode.org/Public/UNIDATA/UnicodeCharacterDatabase.html and
associated Unicode Technical Reports for information needed for consideration by the Unicode Technical Committee for inclusion in the
Unicode Standard.
See above.

C. Technical – Justification

1. Has this proposal for addition of character(s) been submitted before? If YES, explain.
Yes. UTR#3, N3293R
2a. Has contact been made to members of the user community (for example: National Body, user groups of the script or characters, other
experts, etc.)?
Yes.
2b. If YES, with whom?
Ulrich Kozok
2c. If YES, available relevant documents
3. Information on the user community for the proposed characters (for example: size, demographics, information technology use, or
publishing use) is included?
People in northern Sumatra.

14


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4a. The context of use for the proposed characters (type of use; common or rare)
Traditional use.
4b. Reference
5a. Are the proposed characters in current use by the user community?
Yes.
5b. If YES, where?
In Sumatra.
6a. After giving due considerations to the principles in the P&P document must the proposed characters be entirely in the BMP?
Yes.
6b. If YES, is a rationale provided?
Yes.
6c. If YES, reference
Contemporary use and accordance with the Roadmap.
7. Should the proposed characters be kept together in a contiguous range (rather than being scattered)?
Yes.
8a. Can any of the proposed characters be considered a presentation form of an existing character or character sequence?
No.
8b. If YES, is a rationale for its inclusion provided?
8c. If YES, reference
9a. Can any of the proposed characters be encoded using a composed character sequence of either existing characters or other proposed
characters?
No.
9b. If YES, is a rationale for its inclusion provided?
9c. If YES, reference
10a. Can any of the proposed character(s) be considered to be similar (in appearance or function) to an existing character?
No.
10b. If YES, is a rationale for its inclusion provided?
10c. If YES, reference
11a. Does the proposal include use of combining characters and/or use of composite sequences (see clauses 4.12 and 4.14 in ISO/IEC
10646-1: 2000)?
No.
11b. If YES, is a rationale for such use provided?
11c. If YES, reference
11d. Is a list of composite sequences and their corresponding glyph images (graphic symbols) provided?
No.
11e. If YES, reference
12a. Does the proposal contain characters with any special properties such as control function or similar semantics?
No.
12b. If YES, describe in detail (include attachment if necessary)
13a. Does the proposal contain any Ideographic compatibility character(s)?
No.
13b. If YES, is the equivalent corresponding unified ideographic character(s) identified?

15

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